Zarcon Dee Grissom's Idea Page
EV9
Updated 01MAR2009
Home > IdeasTurbo Computer Fans. 
Turbo Computer Fans.
Turbofan addon
The goal is to get every little bit of umph out of my computer fans I can.
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Idea#016

Turbo Computer Fans

Well I am not going to try to re-explain how turbines,
turbo fans, and ducted fans work. Nor am I going to try to explain all the physics behind there function. The goal is to get every little bit of umph out of my computer fans I can.

Apposing fanblades, Counter rotating blade
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Quite some many years ago, I broke off some fan blades and reattached them with super glue in the apposing direction. this produced fans that moved air in the opposite direction or rotation then they were designed for. However there is a limit to how much force super glue can withstand, and I think out of seven fans I modified, ALL of them danced and hopped across the table. Some of them danced around only for a few seconds before shooting there blades in all directions threw the housing. Thankfully for me I new better then have my face right next to the fan, however the table, walls and ceiling did not fair so well.

fan stator DIY assembly
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fan stator assembly testing
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Now that I have found that counter-rotating 80mm fans just are not manufactured Anywhere, and making my own is next to imposable without precision blade balancing equipment. A stator of fixed set of blades behind the rotating fan is the next best thing.

broken fan blades, where did it go?
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However, extracting the blades off of dead fans, is difficult at best. The plastic is extremely brittle if not explosive to an extent on most fans. I still haven't found all the pieces of the above two shattered blades, out of the four.

It's a plastic coffee can, and a dead fan
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In my search around MCC for an Ideal replacement for the Stator blades, I found an almost perfect source of plastic. Yes that is a plastic Coffee can, and I think that red on black looks totally cool. However it only seams to look good with black fans. the red seams to clash with the Thermal take smart-fan orange.

cutting out stator blades
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cutting out stator blades
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cutting out stator blades
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Firs I started by cutting off some pieces to make the curved blades (per-say).

cutting the stator blades to length
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cutting the stator blades to length
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cutting the stator blades to length
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Then I cut them to length, I will need to trim everything after All the pieces are made to fit in the housing.

cutting the diagonal stator pieces
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cutting the diagonal stator pieces
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cutting the diagonal stator pieces
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Then I cut the diagonal pieces that will help hold the blades in place while I hot glue them.


fitting the diagonal pieces
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fitting the diagonal pieces
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I trimmed the diagonal pieces to fit snugly into the old fan housing. You may notice the sketch on the paper, No two housings are alike, so the curve on the outsides of the diagonal parts will never be alike, unless you started with Identical fans (make, model, and year of manufacture).

fitting stator blades
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fitting stator blades, exhaust vs intake
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fitting stator blades, blade direction
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Then I placed the blades in and trimmed them to fit snuggly, and marked the direction and where each blade fit.

cleaning fan stator housing
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cleaning fan stator housing
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Then I cleaned the life out of the housing to ensure the glue would bond to the plastic, not decades of dirt.  I started with glass cleaner spray, and quickly decided on alcohol immersion.

final stator assembly, placing blades in housing
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final stator assembly, tack gluing stator blades in place
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final stator assembly, gluing stator blades in place
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Then I placed the blades back in the housing, and double checked all the blades orientation again with another fan. Let the hut-gluing begine.

Then I trimmed the excess glue off the intake side, after the hot glue had cured (cooled).

Computer Turbofan in action
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Computer Turbofans in action
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Now, even lacking wind measurement tools, I can tell the difference in air flow with my hand. The coffee-can-stator far out performs the one made with old fan blades by a long shot. Smart fans that use to run at about 2100RPM now maintain the same temps at around 1400RPM.

Second, the rubbery nature of the Coffee-can plastic seams to produce no turbine wine, unlike ALL the stators I've made out of
fan blades. The latter could be a function of blade angle, or blade shape, the ratio of number of blades, or distance between stator blades and fan blades as well. I simply lack the equipment to study that further, and I don't care why it dose, only that it dose the job superbly well. Perhaps I could try to mount the fan motor directly on the stator blades to get the distance between there blades down to nothing. That is sure to produce some kind of turbulence, then I could tell for sure if blade distance has anything to do with the lack of noise the coffee-can stator produces.

Another thing, I have noticed that some plastic easter eggs are about the same size as the motor on most computer fans. the shape of the egg also looks similar to the intake and exhaust on some jet engines. I can only guess the shape is for a good reason. I don't think it would be that difficult to mount the rounder end on a grill in front of the fan intake, and the pointy end in the center of the stator on the exhaust side of the fan. just a thought.


And in closing...
Semi Public domain I know that the blade shape of some fans pictured here have probably been patented by the fan manufacturer. The Public Domain only refers to the stator blades made from the plastic coffee can, and the idea of an after-market add-on stator blade assembly for computer fans. The fan housing, fan blades, or any other item pictured on this page are the respected intellectual property of there manufacturers. so with that in mind... I grant anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

And pleas pay attention to ALL the warnings and follow the instructions on whatever type of glue you decide to use.  Don't be stupid and glue your fingers together, or burn yourself with the hot-glue gun or hot-glue.

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My Email link. copy and past. zarcondeegrissom@yahoo.com  
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